<![CDATA[Trip Costa Brava]]>https://tripcostabrava.com/https://tripcostabrava.com/favicon.pngTrip Costa Bravahttps://tripcostabrava.com/Ghost 2.9Sat, 05 Jan 2019 14:30:13 GMT60<![CDATA[10 Things to do on the Costa Brava, Spain]]>Looking for a romantic holiday? A quick weekend away, or a relaxing week to get away from it all?

Whatever you enjoy doing, the Costa Brava, Spain has something to offer.

Things to do, Costa Brava, Spain

Years ago, before I had children, I nearly came to the Costa Brava with my husband-to-be. We were a

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https://tripcostabrava.com/10-things-to-do-on-the-costa-brava-spain/5a847abdb24f1c0018061bb0Mon, 22 Feb 2016 13:10:57 GMT

Looking for a romantic holiday? A quick weekend away, or a relaxing week to get away from it all?

Whatever you enjoy doing, the Costa Brava, Spain has something to offer.

10 Things to do on the Costa Brava, Spain

Years ago, before I had children, I nearly came to the Costa Brava with my husband-to-be. We were a young childless couple. Full of energy, full of wanting to do things.

I didn’t “do” sitting on beaches. I did beaches in passing, on the way to an underwater diving adventure. I was not good at “nothing”. I was not good at relaxing.

That time, we flew into Barcelona, had a quick over night stop at Tossa de Mar. It was very beautiful. Tick. Move on.

We skipped the rest of the coast line in search of excitement.

I had NO idea. I had NO idea that we had just whizzed past one of the most beautiful parts of the world.

Even I, the “don’t do beaches me” would have found something to enjoy here had I stopped off and given it a chance. Even if it had been swim the length of the coast. Or even go for a dive.

Please don’t make the same mistake as that uninformed impatient girl.

From hot melting beaches in the summer, rambling around medieval villages, or wining and dining, the Costa Brava has it all.

  1. Sit on a beach.
  2. Cycling Holiday. There are lots of safe cycling paths in the Costa Brava. It’s a big sport here. You either go it alone, or find an organised tour to join.
  3. Diving. If you love to dive, this is the best location in the Med. Or so the rumour goes. There are lots of diving shops up and down the coast.
  4. A bit of history. Wander around the numerous historic cities, towns and villages.
  5. Catalan Cuisine. The Catalans are very proud of their cuisine and rightly so. They pride themselves in fresh, local produce. A crisp green salad, the catch of the day or a juicy steak if you prefer. Accompanied by a local fruity red wine.
  6. Hiking through the pine woods.
  7. Horse riding. Trek through shady woods
  8. A country get away. Eco tourism is an up and coming business in the Costa Brava. Stay on a farm and get up to milk the cows.
  9. A mountain adventure. The Pyrenees are next door to the Costa Brava. If you fancy getting away from the coast, you can do a day trip or stay a few days.
  10. Just being! My favourite holiday pass time. Just doing nothing and being yourself. Enjoying life.

My life is different now. I relish those moments when I have nothing to do. When I can sit on a beach and drown in a novel.

I have 4 young children and we love the Costa Brava. There is so much for young children to do here.

Whatever you enjoy doing, relaxing, or being active you’ll find something to entertain yourself on the Costa Brava, Spain.

10 Things to do on the Costa Brava, Spain

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<![CDATA[Tamariu, a hidden gem of the Costa Brava]]>Tamariu, Palafrugell is one of the most perfect beaches on the Costa Brava in Spain.

Three of my children are dangling their arms over the rails, overlooking the shimmering, sapphire waters below. They are entranced. Torn between “boat envy” of some tourists who are busy boarding a skiff and the

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https://tripcostabrava.com/tamariu-a-hidden-gem-of-the-costa-brava/5a847abdb24f1c0018061bacMon, 22 Feb 2016 10:40:14 GMT

Tamariu, Palafrugell is one of the most perfect beaches on the Costa Brava in Spain.

Three of my children are dangling their arms over the rails, overlooking the shimmering, sapphire waters below. They are entranced. Torn between “boat envy” of some tourists who are busy boarding a skiff and the lure of the sea anemones that are glinting in the waters below.

Tamariu, a hidden gem of the Costa Brava

Dante wants to jump in to get them. They are a delicacy around here. Perviously the food of peasants, now weighing in at €15 for an appetiser. The local restaurants have caught on and are targeting the rich people from Barcelona who “weekend” in this neck of the woods.
Palafrugell is to Barcelona as the Hamptons are to New York.

It’s a February morning. The air is still. The water dances as the light sparkles, glittering across the surface.

The beach is empty. A few people in the surrounding restaurants enjoying a late breakfast. A pleasant coffee. A leisurely peruse of the paper.

The children have found some rocks to climb and another excitement. A man in a wetsuit and snorkel (not quite as exciting as the divers in the summer) is heading off to find some anemone for a restaurant. (You can see why they attract that price, freshly gathered by hand.)

Tamariu, a hidden gem of the Costa Brava

Tamariu, in Palafrugell is one of those gems of the Costa Brava. A small fishing beach. The fishermen use the beach all year around. Each spring they have a sardine breakfast on the beach to celebrate. To celebrate life and fishing.

Tamariu is just a small nook. Just one little cove. A few hotels, a few apartments and restaurants. A dive shop.

A 5 minute drive to Palafrugell Market.

If you like to walk, you can walk along the coast, or head into the pine woods that offer a respite from the sun during the scorching summer months.

Just one little cove.

What more do you need for your relaxing get away?

One little exquisite cove called Tamariu.

Tamariu, a hidden gem of the Costa Brava

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<![CDATA[9 Things to do at Palafrugell Market]]>https://tripcostabrava.com/palafrugell-market/5a847abdb24f1c0018061baaThu, 28 Jan 2016 10:59:52 GMT

Palafrugell is famous for it’s market. It is the social event of the week when everyone, locals, people from Barcelona and foreign tourists, put on their best outfits and go out to be seen, to chat, to socialise. And perhaps to get their weekly shop.

Palafrugell Daily Market

The fish market, the meat market and a fruit and vegetable market is open every morning of the week, expect Monday. In the summer months, you will find a few fruit and vegetable stand open on Monday.

Palafrugell Sunday Market

The Big Market Day is Sunday. There are more fruit and vegetable stands plus clothes, shoes, nik naks. CDs blaring latino music. Your normal market fair.

  1. Explore the Fish Market. Check out the bright pink lobsters, their claws taped together, their beady eyes watching. Or how about the ugliest fish on the slab? The monk fish, looking like a swollen fishy balloon. You’ll find cheap mackerel (‘barat’), muscles, anchovies and sardines. So freshly caught they’re still wriggling.

    Most of the fish is locally caught, but you can check with the stall holder. Tuna is not local, it has probably been shipped from America. Muscles are probably from Spain but not “local”.

    Catalans will happily pay a fortune on fish for a special occasion. Which is just as well as Palamos prawns weigh in at €80 a kilo.

  2. Wander around the Meat Market.
    The meat market is the building next door to the fish market. You can buy cooked or raw meat, plus a good selection of cheeses and dairy products. Check out the little cafe at the back, they do a great breakfast.

  3. Fruit and Vegetables.
    The Fruit and Vegetable Market is the main reason to go to market. I love seeing the rows and rows of different tomatoes. The aubergines with their shiny purple skin. The apples neatly packed in their boxes.

    In the summer, you’ll find exquisite ripe peaches, pink and fuzzy. You bite into them and the juice runs down your face. Have a look out for the little “flatties”, little squashed peaches that taste like they’re made of honey.

  4. Chat to a Stall Holder.
    Pluck up your courage and talk to a stall holder. Some of the older ones have been going to that market every day for decades. They stand their all year around, wrapped up in shawls with finger-less gloves in the winter. Their skin wrinkled like the olives they sell. What amazing stories from history they have to tell.

  5. Find the Most Expensive Vegetable you can.
    It never ceases to amaze me how the prices of fruit and vegetables vary at market. I play a game. I want to buy the best produce for the best price. Sometimes the cheapest isn’t so great. Sometimes the most expensive is ridiculous. My friends once paid €5 a kilo for some tomatoes. I refuse to pay more than €1.50 (and normally pay less than €1.) Beware of tourist prices!

  6. Jostle your way through the clothes stalls.
    You’ll find new clothes and old. In the winter, coats, scarves, slippers and hats. In the summer, dresses, t-shirts and bikinis. Toys for the children. CDs, kitchen ware, watches. Other random things you don’t need.

  7. Chocolate and Churros.
    If you manage to make it all the way to the top, you’ll be rewarded with the hot chocolate and churros van. Definitely a Catalan treat to enjoy but you probably won’t get much change from €10.

  8. Beer in the Plaza.
    It’s never too early to drink alcohol in Spain. Wine for breakfast? No problem. Their typical working man’s coffee is called a “carojel” (pronounced “caro-heel”) a black coffee with a shot of brandy. If that’s too much for you, you can enjoy a Sunday brunch beer in the Plaza and watch the crowds go by. If you want to read an english newspaper, they sell them in the book shop on the corner.

  9. Make it Home with your Purchases.
    Easier said than done! You’ll see all the locals with trolleys or baskets. It’s not unusual to see a big burly man, beard, leather jacket, sporting tattoos, carrying a cute little wicker basket. Personally, I normally leave 2 large bags at a stand, stagger home with my trolley and send my husband back for the bags. (He refuses to carry a basket.)

Palafrugell Sunday market is the social event of the week. If you want to see what life is like here, what the locals really do, be sure not to miss it.

9 Things to do at Palafrugell Market

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<![CDATA[9 Things to do in Palafrugell, Costa Brava]]>Palafrugell is the quintessential Costa Brava. It is a quiet yet beautiful town, where every rich Barcelonian wants to have their second home. You can see the true Costa Brava here. Palafrugell isn’t just a tourist town, people live here all year around.

In the summer, Palafrugell is vibrant

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https://tripcostabrava.com/9-things-to-do-in-palafrugell-costa-brava/5a847abdb24f1c0018061ba9Thu, 28 Jan 2016 10:41:34 GMT

Palafrugell is the quintessential Costa Brava. It is a quiet yet beautiful town, where every rich Barcelonian wants to have their second home. You can see the true Costa Brava here. Palafrugell isn’t just a tourist town, people live here all year around.

In the summer, Palafrugell is vibrant and humming. It is an awesome place to hang out, especially if you fancy a break from the beaches.

  1. Enjoy the Plaza.
    Sip a glass of cava and watch the world go by. This is the heart of the town where the retired towns folk come to put the world to rights and the child whizz around on their scooters. Everyone congregates here. It is the place to be, especially on Sunday Market. During the summer months, there is live entertainment in the evenings.
  2. Palafrugell Market.
    The market here is amazing. It’s open every morning, except Monday. There’s a big market on Sunday morning.
  3. Climb the water tower.
    The big tower in the Camp Mario (the square behind the market). It’s open in the morning and evening. It costs around a €1 to go up. There is an amazing view from the top but not for the faint hearted. (Is it me or is it something to do with getting older? The older I get, the less I like heights.) The square at the bottom is a great place for kids to run around.
  4. Art Museum.
    Enjoy a bit of culture? Check out the art museum. It’s not open all year around (it depends on their exhibitions) but it’s only a couple of euros to enter. (At the bottom of the water tower.)
  5. Wander through the back streets.
    Enjoy looking at the doors and little streets. Can you peek into any gardens?
    9 Things to do in Palafrugell, Costa Brava
  6. Festival of Primavera.
    The Spring parade is amazing. A fiesta in true Spanish style. Dance groups in amazing costumes with deafening music. Check the lorries to see how many pints of beer you can see balanced on the bumpers. The procession happens every year in May or June. (If you’re not here at that time, there are heaps of fiestas in different villages throughout the summer. You’re bound to find one if you want to.)
  7. Grab a coffee in the Fraternal Centre.
    In the Plaza you can see the theatre (which used to be the “bosses club” the rich land owners club.) Next door is the “Fraternal Centre” the working man’s club. (Or girl, you don’t have to be male to enter.) It’s still a club and you can see people playing backgammon and chess. It’s open to the public. You can go in and have a look around. If you ask nicely, they might show you the amazing library upstairs.
  8. Giants.
    Check out the town giants in the library. (Just down the slope from the Plaza.) Each town has a pair of giants that come out for town celebrations. The giants of Palafrugell are called Pitu and Lluna and represent the story of the foundation of the Baix Emporda (the county). They are a peasant and a mermaid who got married and settled in the Baix Emporda, a compromise between the sea and the mountains.
  9. Old Town.
    Get lost in the old town. Behind the church, you’ll find the old village. There’s a map in the floor in front of the church that shows you where the old town wall used to be. It’s only a few streets. Check out “carrer major”, “Main Street”. Well it used to be!

For such a small town, there are so many things to do in Palafrugell. You’ll get a glimpse of real life in the Costa Brava.

9 Things to do in Palafrugell, Costa Brava

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<![CDATA[Beaches of Calella de Palafrugell]]>Calella de Palafrugell is one of the most special villages on the Costa Brava. It has the charm of a rustic fishing village, white washed arches and fishing boats in situ, with enough restaurants and bars to create a lively atmosphere. A perfect place to relax, kick back and drink

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https://tripcostabrava.com/beaches-of-calella-de-palafrugell/5a847abdb24f1c0018061ba7Thu, 28 Jan 2016 10:17:43 GMT

Calella de Palafrugell is one of the most special villages on the Costa Brava. It has the charm of a rustic fishing village, white washed arches and fishing boats in situ, with enough restaurants and bars to create a lively atmosphere. A perfect place to relax, kick back and drink in the Catalan culture.

You’ll could easily spend a week here and not go to the same beach more than once.

Calella de Palafrugell is ideal for families with young children. The sea is usually as still as a mill pond. At Port Bo it is shallow and safe for toddlers and babies to paddle and splash.

Older children enjoy snorkelling, clambering on the rocks, rock pooling and other beach activities.

There are plenty of costal and wooded walks if you like stretch your legs and get away from the beaches.
Beaches of Calella de Palafrugell

Beaches of Calella, Palafrugell

All of these beaches are within in walking distance for a person of normal mobility.

  1. Canadell de Calella. The biggest and normally busiest of beaches. You’ll find somewhere to park your towel, even in the height of summer. Sports a couple of restaurants and kayak hire.
  2. Port Bo, Port de Malaespina, Platja d’en Calau. This is actually 3 beaches rather than one. This is one of my favourite places in the summer. The sea is aqua marine, shimmering. Beckoning. The white arcs and fishing boats afford some shade and transport you a fairy-tale romance.
  3. La Plageta “Little Beach” Next along there is a tiny beach. The only access is down a large flight of stairs.
  4. Port Pelegri. Another largish beach. The water is deeper here so not so great for young children who want to paddle. But the fish love the deeper waters. If you bring a slice of bread, you’ll quickly find that you have a whole shoal around your feed. Great restaurant (not cheap but a good holiday treat.) Also kayak/SUP board hire and a diving shop. The dive boat goes in and out and the kids love to watch it arrive.
  5. Canyers. The tiniest beach in the world. Look out for the wild tomatoes that often grow in the rocks.
  6. Golfet. A local’s secret. Don’t tell them I told you about it. It’s a short walk along the costal path. (Or if you drive, you need to walk down a steep path.) This is a beautiful beach but it has no amenities. Golfet is great for shade in the summer. Also awesome for snorkeling and boat watching.

If you spent your entire holiday at Calella de Palafrugell, you would have an amazing, relaxing time.

P.S. There is another “Calella” that is much closer to Barcelona. Not to be confused with “Calella de Palafrugell”.

Beaches of Calella de Palafrugell

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<![CDATA[The Weather on the Costa Brava]]>https://tripcostabrava.com/the-weather-on-the-costa-brava/5a847abdb24f1c0018061ba5Tue, 26 Jan 2016 16:11:58 GMT

What is the weather like in the Costa Brava? When is the best time of year to come to the Costa Brava? It depends on what you want to do.

I love all the seasons here, all for different reasons.

Summer Climate in the Costa Brava

Summer in the Costa Brava is hot. The average day in July and August reaches a high of 30°C (86°F). Occasionally it gets hotter. For me, that’s hot. I melt at that temperature. I can’t survive the day without getting into a pool of water, preferably the cool, refreshing sea.

The nights are warm. You’ll be throwing off your sheet.

Rainfall is minimal during the summer. It’s pretty much unheard of for it to rain in August, although it did a few years ago. Everyone was very upset.

Autumn Weather in the Costa Brava

Autumn is a beautiful time of year here. The crowds have gone, leaving the beaches deserted. It’s quite normal to be swimming in the sea up until November (and I don’t like it cold.)

September and October are often an extension of summer and many people prefer the weather at that time as it’s not overbearingly hot.

There are normally heavy rains in Autumn (although not every year.) When it rains here, it’s not a drop or two, it’s a river coming from the sky. It doesn’t tend to last long though. A storm followed by a blue sky is the norm.

Winter in the Costa Brava

I love winter in the Costa Brava. The days vary. My favourites are the warm winter sun. The temperature may reach 17°C or higher. Perfect for eating outside.

The nights are cooler. You can snuggle in your winter duvet.

When the wind blows from the Pyrenees “the Tramuntana”, it can be an icy, knifing wind. The temperature drops and it feels even colder that it is. Time to snuggle by the open fire, drink hot chocolate and eat churros.

There are also damp, chilly days that are not my favourite. Luckily they don’t tend to last long and the sky is normally high.

Spring in the Costa Brava

A beautiful time of year. The flowers are out, the wheat is green, making everything look green and lush. Perfect for a bike ride or a hike in the woods.

In can rain in the Spring. Heavy rain.

Rainfall in the Costa Brava

It doesn’t rain much in the Costa Brava but when it does rain it REALLY rains. It POURS. The roads become rivers and many of the un-tarmac-ed roads are washed away. The houses have special boards that they put over the front doors to stop the water from coming in.

If your drainage isn’t working properly you’ll soon find that you have a swimming pool in the back garden. Great for kids in welly boots.

Most rain in the Costa Brava falls in the Spring, April, May, June and the Autumn, October and November. Normally it will be just a few days at a time and then the blue skies will return.

Winds in the Costa Brava

Locals have a different name for each of the 8 different winds. The two winds that I’m aware of are the Tramuntana that blows from the Pyrenees in the North. It is most notable in the winter when it is sharp and icy.

The Tramuntana wind can blow at any time of the year, including during the summer when it will actually be quite refreshing.

The further South you go, the less the effects of the Tramuntana.

The other wind to note is the on-shore wind from the sea (the Llevant). This can also blow at any time of the year, but typically builds up on a summer afternoon. The morning will be still and stifling but by the afternoon, the flags will be happily flapping away.

When is the Best Time of Year to Go to the Costa Brava?

It depends on what you want to do. Sun and sea in the summer or sun and activities in the winter. Why not try them all and see which you like best for yourself?

The Weather on the Costa Brava

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<![CDATA[Welcome to Ghost]]>You're live! Nice. We've put together a little post to introduce you to the Ghost editor and get you started. You can manage your content by signing in to the admin area at <your blog URL>/ghost/. When you arrive, you can select this post from a list

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https://tripcostabrava.com/welcome-to-ghost/5a847abcb24f1c0018061ba3Sat, 16 Jan 2016 12:50:22 GMTYou're live! Nice. We've put together a little post to introduce you to the Ghost editor and get you started. You can manage your content by signing in to the admin area at <your blog URL>/ghost/. When you arrive, you can select this post from a list on the left and see a preview of it on the right. Click the little pencil icon at the top of the preview to edit this post and read the next section!

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